Talk To Frank resources-for-family

What Is Talk To Frank?

Talk To Frank is an anti-drugs campaign in the United Kingdom that has been running for the longest time. Though, has the campaign stopped anybody from using any drugs?

A police Swat team in the UK burst into a kitchen of a quiet suburban home, and the results were a complete turnaround of the way drug education was done for good. Grim warnings about how drugs could mess you up and genuine pleas to resist the pushers that were creeping around every playground were gone. In came strange humour and a light, yet energetic approach.


The first advert featured a boy calling the police snatch squad on his mother because she wanted to discuss drugs with him. There was also a new message Drugs are illegal. Talking about the isn't. So talk to Frank."


Frank Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

Thought up by promotion organization Mother, Frank was, indeed, the new name for the National Drugs Helpline. Young people were meant to feel Frank was a helpful elder brother they could trust and from whom they could seek advice on illegal drugs. To become a familiar brand with youth in the UK, the Frank label has presented everything from the adventures of pablo the drug mule to a tour of a brain warehouse.


Significantly, Frank was never found in the flesh, so would never be the objective of joke for wearing the wrong trainers or attempting to be "down with the children," says Justin Tindall, inventive director of ad organization Leo Burnett. Even the YouTube videos that spoof Frank are respectful. One more thing that distinguishes Frank from other government-funded campaigns is that nothing links the ad to the government in anyway whatsoever.

Substance education has developed a lot since Nancy Reagan, and in the United Kingdom, Grange Hill cast encouraged teens to simply "Say No" to drugs, a campaign which several professionals now think had the opposite of the desire effect.


Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. You still see pictures of prison bars and upset parents, though, in countries where dealing drugs will get you in serious trouble with the law. You play, you pay. is the ad used to warn young people going for night clubbing in Singapore.

Above the Influence, which is an ad that has lasted for a very long time to encourage young people to seek for alternatives to drugs, and which has gulped the UK government some huge amount of money combine caution and humour. The accentuation is on conversing with youngsters in their own particular dialect - one promotion demonstrates a group of "stoners" marooned on a couch. Though, an unexpected number of anti-drug campaigns all over the globe still resort back to strategies intended to arouse fear or alarm, specifically the substance-fuelled plunge to hell. The DrugsNot4Me series recently launched a commercial in Canada that shows a beautiful, self-assured young lady metamorphosis after using "drugs" into a shaking, hollow-eyed mess.

Ads that reveal the dangers of drug abuse mostly push frustrated people into experimenting with drugs, according to a data from the anti-drugs campaign of the UK from 1999 to 2004.


The opposition Conservative politicians were initially against Frank, simply because it pointed out the ups and downs of drug use, but it made giant strides.


An early ad posted online told viewers, "Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world."

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. The person behind this cocaine ad has said that he now thinks he thought the average person browsing the web had a longer attention span. It is difficult for some to view the ad till the last point where the dangers of drug use were listed. However, Powell claims the objective was to be more open with youngsters regarding substances, in an attempt to form the credibility of the Frank image.

According to the Home Office, up to 67% of teenagers preferred to talk to Frank if drug advice becomes necessary. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. These figures provide proof that the Frank approach bears results.

However, just like every other anti-drugs campaign in the world , there's no evidence that Frank has actually stopped people from taking drugs.

In the years since the campaign started, drug use in the UK is down by 9%; however, experts say this might be because marijuana use has declined, most like due to changing attitudes toward smoking tobacco.


Frank - What Is It?

FRANK was launched in 2003 as a collaborated effort of the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government as a national drug education service. It was designed to lower the rate of both legal and illegal drug use by providing education to teenagers and young people about what the effects of using drug and alcohol could be. It has run numerous media promotions on radio and the web.


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Services

Available services at FRANK for those who seek help about drugs include

  • A website
  • A private phone number that is available round-the-clock
  • Email
  • An anonymous live chat every afternoon 2-6pm
  • A facility to find counselling besides management